Documentary Film Series


Join the Library the second Monday of every month at 7:00 p.m. for a new documentary film series! Take advantage of stadium seating, new HD projection, and free popcorn in the Library’s auditorium. For trailers and ratings, visit the Library’s website.


February 11 — Catfish

When Nev Shulman, a New York photographer, receives a Facebook request from a child named Abby, he cannot guess the unusual odyssey on which he will soon embark. Abby sends Nev an unusually skilled painting based on one of his photos. Intrigued, he begins online relationships with the rest of Abby’s family, including her older sister, Megan. Though troubling inconsistencies soon emerge, Nev continues his online flirtation with Megan, resulting in a road trip to meet her in person.

(2010, Rated PG-13, 1 hour 34 minutes)


March 11 — Encounters at the End of the World

Acclaimed filmmaker Werner Herzog travels to Antarctica, where he finds a desolate, beautiful landscape, largely untouched by human hands, and a group of truly unique people who risk their lives to study it. Centered at McMurdo Station, the United States’ largest Antarctic research center, Herzog explores the minds of the scientists willing to abandon civilization and endure volatile conditions to learn more about the continent’s wildlife and awe-inspiring natural wonders.

(2007, Rated G, 1 hour 41 minutes)


April 8 — Man on Wire

Using actual footage from the event seamlessly mingled with new re-enactments, filmmaker James Marsh masterfully recreates high-wire daredevil Philippe Petit’s 1974 stunt: performing acrobatics on a thin wire strung between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center. Plotting his feat like a master cat burglar, Petit enlists the help of a motley group of friends as he calculates every detail, from acquiring building access to stringing up the wire, and manages to pull off an astounding crime.

(2008, Rated PG-13, 1 hour 34 minutes)


May 13 — Inside Job

The global financial meltdown that took place in Fall 2008 caused millions of job and home losses and plunged the United States into a deep economic recession. Matt Damon narrates a documentary that provides a detailed examination of the elements that led to the collapse and identifies keys financial and political players. Director Charles Ferguson conducts a wide range of interviews and traces the story from the United States to China to Iceland to several other global financial hot spots.

(2010, Rated PG-13, 1 hour 48 minutes)


June 10 — Jodorowsky’s Dune

Filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky discusses how he would have adapted Frank Herbert’s classic sci-fi novel “Dune” for the big screen.

(2013, Rated PG-13, 1 hour 30 minutes)


July 8 — My Kid Could Paint That

After watching her dad paint, 4-year-old Marla Olmstead decides she’d like to be a painter too. Showing remarkable facility, she’s soon got paintings hanging in a local coffee shop and a handful of interested buyers. A local paper picks up the story, followed by the New York Times, and overnight Marla is hailed as a child prodigy. But not everybody is convinced that Marla painted the works alone. In the wake of a “60 Minutes” piece about her, it begins to look more and more like she had help.

(2007, Rated PG-13, 1 hour 23 minutes)


August 12 — The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara

Former corporate whiz kid Robert McNamara was the controversial Secretary of Defense in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, during the height of the Vietnam War. This Academy Award-winning documentary, augmented by archival footage, gives the conflicted McNamara a platform on which he attempts to confront his and the U.S. government’s actions in Southeast Asia in light of the horrors of modern warfare, the end of ideology and the punitive judgment of history.

(2003, Rated PG-13, 1 hour 47 minutes)

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